Cubs 3, Dodgers 2 (4.101.7)

In Postgame by berselius164 Comments

OSS: Cubs raise the banners and pull out a late win.

Three up:

  1. The Cubs are World Series champions, in case you didn't know. I love the designs on the new banners.
  2. Anthony Rizzo's first RBI of the year was a walk-off against a guy who was one of the top five relievers in baseball last year. He also led the way in the pregame ceremonies, which was great to see.
  3. Justin Grimm was the day's WPA leader, thanks to his getting out of a bases loaded no outs jam with a one run lead.

Three down:

  1. Carl Edwards just didn't have it tonight, completely unable to find a strike zone. Luckily Grimm was able to bail him out.
  2. The Cubs had a few rough PAs, but the one that looked the worst was Baez's strikeout in the eighth. He was able to lay off one or two of Romo's sliders, but chased his way to a strikeout anyway.
  3. The Dodgers tied it up thanks to an ill-advised throw by Addison Russell on a tough double play. I actually thought it was Baez when I was watching it, since Addy is usually so good ad putting the ball in his pocket in these situations.

Next up: A boring off-day, then Lackey takes on Brandon McCarthy on Wednesday night.

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  1. Berselius is too lazy to login

    SK,

    You are right, it was 94. But I am pretty sure espn had 92 (dying laughing).

      Quote  Reply

  2. cerulean

    Rice Cube:
    dmick89,

    A .714 winning average would be acceptable.

    You would settle for merely acceptable? They would only win about 116 games in that case.

    No team that has won 116 games ever went on to win the World Series.

      Quote  Reply

  3. Berselius is too lazy to login

    dmick89:
    Cary Wood had a great fastball. If only he and Mark Pryor could have stayed healthy.

    I believe you are talking about Kerry Woods, my frent.

      Quote  Reply

  4. cerulean

    Remeber when Jim Henry signed Ted Lily from a hospital? I think it was the same year he got Adolpho Soreono. And Jayson Marquee—he was coming off a monster season.

      Quote  Reply

  5. cerulean

    Rizzo the Rat,

    Jim Wrigley was the worst manager. I still don’t know why they named the field after him.

    Should have stuck with Thom Treblehorn.

    SK,

    It was weird how they ran Dusty out of town, replaced him with Butch Kim, then rehired him. He did do a pretty good job even though Sammy Sossa was in decline.

      Quote  Reply

  6. dmick89

    Rizzo the Rat,

    I don’t think the division race is over just yet. I can see both of these teams winning between 115 and 145 games. It’s going to be a close race and whichever teams wins more games will win the division.

      Quote  Reply

  7. Perkins

    The Reds’ hot start reminds me of the 2006 Cubs, who had a pretty good April but were an obviously bad team (though at the time, I was dumb enough to have hope).

      Quote  Reply

  8. cerulean

    Perkins,

    The Reds hot start reminds me of 2016, when they were in first place until Addison Russell hit a go ahead homerun to put them in their place. (These Cubs sure have a flair for the dramatic, particularly on opening day.)

      Quote  Reply

  9. Troy Oh Leerie

    cerulean,

    But part of the reason that team fell apart was that big injury to Lee. If he was healthy they probably would’ve been at least respectable

      Quote  Reply

  10. Perkins

    Troy Oh Leerie:
    cerulean,

    But part of the reason that team fell apart was that big injury to Lee. If he was healthy they probably would’ve been at least respectable

    The injury to Lee was bad, though 2006 was also the last year the Cubs tried to count on Wood and Prior, which also didn’t work out too well.

      Quote  Reply

  11. Berselius is too lazy to login

    To-day’s base ball squadron

    Schwarber
    Bryant
    Rizzo
    Zobrist
    Russell
    Heyward
    Contreras
    Lackey
    Jay

      Quote  Reply

  12. cerulean

    uncle dave,

    They got rid of clubhouse cancer Chris Sale, so I expect great things from them this year.

    #seriously

    #reallyNotJoking

    #whyDoYouKeepThinkingIAmJoking

    #thereAreSoManyAlternativeFactsToBackMeUp

      Quote  Reply

  13. SK

    dmick89,

    I just remember hearing 47,000,000 times on the radio and TV broadcast (and from beat writers) how he was such an incredible hard worker, first at the park every day.

      Quote  Reply

  14. Perkins

    Those rings were pretty rad. And it was kind of cool that they were playing parts of the Lord of the Rings soundtrack during the ceremony.

    My geek worlds are colliding tonight.

      Quote  Reply

  15. cerulean

    Rizzo the Rat: Taking on an 0-2 count with a runner in scoring position was a brilliant strategy. I bet they didn’t see that coming!

    Nobody saw Trump coming either.

    (Save for some fake Russian hookers, maybe.)

      Quote  Reply

  16. cerulean

    Perkins,

    Baseball savant has the 2015–16 data, but 2017 doesn’t seem to be available yet. I think this happened last year too, so maybe it will become available soon.

      Quote  Reply

  17. cerulean

    So, uh, everyone worried that Hillary would start WWIII must be heartened by recent turns of events.

    When two thin-skinned propagandists adept at sowing discord discover collaboration to be anathema to their being, good* things happen.

    *I am using an alternative definition here.

      Quote  Reply

  18. Berselius is too lazy to login

    To-day’s base ball squadron

    Schwarber
    Bryant
    Rizzo
    Russell
    Contreras
    Almora
    Heyward
    Baez
    Anderson

      Quote  Reply

  19. uncle dave

    cerulean,

    We bombed six different countries in 2016, so while this doesn’t exactly feel great, it’s not particularly far removed from the status quo, either. I don’t like the seemingly indiscriminate nature of our military actions these days, but people have been way too comfortable with the supposed separation of war and civilian populations for the past couple of decades.

    Nothing about what Trump is doing now diminishes the brutality of what we were doing under Obama, and it was a solid bet that Clinton would have gone further than that. I still feel comfortable with my criticisms.

      Quote  Reply

  20. dmick89

    uncle dave:
    cerulean,

    Nothing about what Trump is doing now diminishes the brutality of what we were doing under Obama

    I’ve been trying to argue this with some friends for about 6 weeks and I can’t seem to get them to understand the brutality of the Obama administration. Because it’s not as bad as Trump, it didn’t happen to these friends.

      Quote  Reply

  21. cerulean

    uncle dave,

    If you ever said that you voted for Trump because he is not as hawkish as Hillary (that is, has no prior experience except as a professional celebrity throwing bombs on Twitter) my comment was directed at you. Otherwise, carry on.

    I fear Putin knows how to push Trumps buttons (lovers as they were) so he will be able to goad the the shape-shifting Donald into escalating. A dance of devastation by lovers scorned.

    The power, the devastation, is very important to me.

    —Donald Trump on nuclear weapons

      Quote  Reply

  22. uncle dave

    dmick89,

    None of this is to excuse people who believed that Trump would keep us out of war, or wouldn’t actually be worse. The guy was clearly going to be a disaster. But I feel like we need a reckoning with the whole shebang, not just with what’s happened over the past two months.

      Quote  Reply

  23. uncle dave

    cerulean,

    Nah, that would be just dumb. But to hear a lot of folks on the center-left talk these days, we were all sitting home and drinking lemonade before mid-January, not sending a fleet of robots around the world to assassinate civilians.

      Quote  Reply

  24. Perkins

    dmick89: I’ve been trying to argue this with some friends for about 6 weeks and I can’t seem to get them to understand the brutality of the Obama administration. Because it’s not as bad as Trump, it didn’t happen to these friends.

    I think an important distinction is that Trump’s decisions nearly always seem to stem from either malice or incompetence, and his domestic policy is unnecessarily cruel in a lot of ways. For most people, they at least got the sense that Obama was trying to do the right (or at least good) thing, regardless of the means or outcome.

    That said, my biggest problem with the Obama administration’s foreign policy is that its use of violence frequently did not seem to be tied to outcomes (the surge in Afghanistan was a spectacular failure; the bombing campaign in Syria and Iraq diidn’t have clear objectives or a strategy for victory beyond holding the line for the next administration to solve). Beyond that, he continued and expanded on the Bush-era reliance on military solutions to problems best solved by State or another civilian agency (the military will do its best, but soldiers are not primarily diplomats or economic development specialists). On a more tactical/operational level, he also seemed to see Special Operations Forces and drones as silver bullets to deliver a kinetic outcome without putting a ton of people in harm’s way, an approach that has its own problems (not least of which is the crushing optempo in the SOF community).

    For all of President Obama’s rhetoric about not getting into military adventurism, he really didn’t have a problem with it as long as the political risk to himself was low.

      Quote  Reply

  25. cerulean

    Almora has walked as much as he has struck out in 15 steps to the plate: 2 times. He might one of those players the Cubs can use to get past the Mets and finally make it to the World Series.

      Quote  Reply

  26. uncle dave

    Perkins: For all of President Obama’s rhetoric about not getting into military adventurism, he really didn’t have a problem with it as long as the political risk to himself was low.

    That’s the way a lot of decisions are made, unfortunately.

    I think what gets lost in this discussion sometimes is how poorly suited military action seems to be if the intent is to do something besides go in, kick everyone’s ass, and take over. I don’t know enough to say what an appropriate level of engagement might be, but if you don’t want collateral damage and you don’t have clearly established conditions for engagement, victory, and disengagement, using full military force seems to be a poor fit no matter how good the execution is. Maybe there’s no reasonable alternative. I dunno.

      Quote  Reply

  27. Perkins

    uncle dave,

    One of the big takeaways I had from Bob Gates’s memoir was the shoehorning of the military into roles that State should do, but didn’t because they either didn’t have the funding or couldn’t find people.

    Anecdotally, my battalion was involved in public works projects in our sector of northern Afghanistan (getting wells dug, schools and hospitals built or renovated, etc.), and pretty much every unit there had a similar task in addition to their primary missions. The Army has a branch called Civil Affairs that focuses on that type of stuff, but there’s not too many of them, and a lot of those tasks aren’t things that a normal operational unit should have to do.

    One of the biggest failures of the GWOT is that neither Iraq or Afghanistan had clearly defined victory conditions or measurable ways to define success. I use it as an example of what not to do when I teach project management courses (specifically around scoping and outcomes). The fact that most of the public has been entirely insulated from the wars has only reinforced that it’s somehow worthwhile to have an occupation force abroad for a decade and a half without any real sign of success.

      Quote  Reply

  28. uncle dave

    Perkins,

    Seems like we could do a lot of that without the whole war part, no? But maybe the war itself is the point.

    I’ve never been in the military (and never will be, since I’m already 43 somehow). I can’t imagine how insane the bureaucracy must be given the breadth of what the military actually does these days.

      Quote  Reply

  29. cerulean

    Rizzo the Rat:
    Why couldn’t the Cubs play this well yesterday, when I was able to watch them?

    They were feeling such a pressure to perform because they knew you were watching.

      Quote  Reply

  30. cerulean

    uncle dave,

    I like to keep in mind that institutions are living things. They have to eat and shit like the rest of us, and their continued existence relies on self-preservation.

    So institutions that have stuck around have adapted to certain conditions and changed others to fit themselves better. The larger the institution, the harder it is to adapt but the easier it is to change its environment to suit itself. If there are no checks on it, no constraints, it grows to collapse under its own weight often by destroying the institutions that it comprises or that comprise it.

    When that happens, institutions die sudden and dramatic deaths that can ripple out and destroy others, exactly like the financial collapses we’ve had or the cancer that has taken many in my family. It’s the same processes at different levels.

    So when I see the horrible brutality of drone strikes in the name of protection from terror, I see them as an action by the emergent agency of our system of defense. I can and do blame Obama and his administration, but blame falls equally on congress and the military leaders throughout the chain of command. But I did at least trust Obama to seek diplomacy first. I don’t feel that way about Trump (though there may be a tactical advantages to playing the loose cannon, I can tell pretty easily that he is not thinking tactically).

    If a system is built for defense and defense extends beyond our borders because of our global interdependence, this is what happens.

    When I am supreme dictator of world, I will rebrand the military as an aid organization before inadvertently destroying everything.

      Quote  Reply

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