Fangraphs and the grammar police

Tangotiger posted something the other day asking readers if they liked Fangraphs. There were mixed reviews. Since I know you want to know what I think, here's what I wrote:

I visit Fangraphs and B-Ref daily. I’d say most days I visit each site more than once. However, I rarely visit Fangraphs for anything other than their stats. The quality of the articles they publish is very poor in my opinion. If there’s an article Tango or MGL links to I’ll read it and it’s usually good, but there’s so much stuff on there I’d classify as garbage. As a result, I only read the blogs that people have linked to.

I'm curious what OV readers think of Fangraphs too.

Also, one of the complaints was about poor spelling or grammar or something like it. I have no problem with people pointing out a spelling error.

I agree with Ken/87. I don’t care about typos and don’t even proof-read my own blogs, but if someone points out an error I either take the time to correct it (usually not) or ignore it. It’s never bothered me that someone has pointed out a typo that I made. As a result, the comment about my typo is lost without everyone on the site drawing even more attention to it. Like Ken, I definitely find the negative reaction to such comments more annoying because it highlights the error further when it didn’t need to be.

it reminds me of the sites where some commenter will ask a question and then you have 8 commenters telling the person to look back at the last thread for the answer. Just answer the damn question or ignore it.

Take the last thread here, RC pointed out an error in the Cubs record. I had them at 58-59 and they obviously are not that. I corrected it. It's important to the article and I'm glad he pointed it out. Had he pointed out a spelling error I'd probably have just ignored the comment, but not because I find it irritating that someone would point out a spelling error. It just doesn't bother me (a spelling error or someone pointing it out).

I'm wondering what your thoughts are on the grammar police.

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